Outline of Goldilocks and the Three Bears

Somebody suggested I do a basic story outline of a familiar tale, so here it is:

Goldilocks goes for a walk but is lost and hungry.

Goldilocks finds a house but it’s empty.

It’s somebody else’s house, but hunger makes her go inside.

She finds porridge, but it’s not hers.

She shouldn’t but hunger makes her sample the first bowl.

She tries the first bowl but it’s too hot.

She tries the second bowl, but it’s too salty.

She tries the third bowl with low expectations, but it’s perfect and she eats it all up.

She’s no longer hungry, but now she’s sleepy.

It’s not her house, but the owners haven’t returned so she goes upstairs.

She tries the first bed but it’s too hard.

She tries the second bed but it’s too soft.

She tries the third bed with low expectations, but it’s perfect and she falls asleep.

Now she’s no longer sleep deprived, but she wakes up to three angry bears….

Plenty of buts in that one! The odd thing about fairy tales is that they are almost outlines anyway…

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Writer. Swordsman.
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Posted in Storyteller Tools
2 comments on “Outline of Goldilocks and the Three Bears
  1. Geoff Hart says:

    Martin notes: “The odd thing about fairy tales is that they are almost outlines anyway…”

    That’s probably why they endure: they’re archetypal stories, stripped down to their minimum essence. I’m not always a fan of minimalist writing, but it does have its virtues, and verbosity should be a deliberate choice. Instead, it’s often a reaction to a market that pays by the word.

  2. Destiny says:

    🙂

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